Week 18 (2017)

Dye makes flu germs visible to the naked eye

Summary: Researchers have discovered a way to make influenza visible to the naked eye, by engineering dye molecules to target a specific enzyme of the virus.
Interest Group: Research
Research Organization: University of Notre Dame
Journal Article:Journal of the American Chemical Society Fluorescent Neuraminidase Assay Based on Supramolecular Dye Capture After Enzymatic Cleavage.
Full Press Release: Distributed by ScienceDaily
ID:HN1585-006
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New defense mechanism against bacteria discovered

Summary: Researchers believe they have cracked the mystery of why we are able to quickly prevent an infection from spreading uncontrollably in the body during wounding. They believe this knowledge may be of clinical significance for developing new ways to counteract bacteria.
Interest Group: Research
Research Organization: Lund University
Journal Article:Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Aggregation of thrombin-derived C-terminal fragments as a previously undisclosed host defense mechanism.
Full Press Release: Distributed by ScienceDaily
ID:HN1585-007
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CategoryMicrobes

Prolonged military-style training causes changes to intestinal bacteria, increases inflammation

Summary: A new study finds that long periods of physiological stress can change the composition of microorganisms residing in the intestines (intestinal microbiota), which could increase health risks in endurance athletes and military personnel.
Interest Group: Research
Research Organization: American Physiological Society (APS)
Journal Article:American Journal of Physiology – Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology Changes in intestinal microbiota composition and metabolism coincide with increased intestinal permeability in young adults under prolonged physiologic stress.
Full Press Release: Distributed by ScienceDaily
ID:HN1585-014
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Immunotherapy targets in early-stage lung cancer

Summary: Immunotherapy, which has achieved remarkable results in late-stage lung cancer patients, can also hold great hope for newly diagnosed patients, cutting the deadly disease off before it has the chance to take hold and offering a potential cure, according to a new study.
Interest Group: Research
Research Organization: The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Journal Article:Cell Innate Immune Landscape in Early Lung Adenocarcinoma by Paired Single-Cell Analyses.
Full Press Release: Distributed by ScienceDaily
ID:HN1585-019
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